Kenmore 10641012100 user manual download (Page 7 of 52)

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Page 7 of 52
Connecting to Water Line
1=
2.
3=
Unplug
refrigerator
or disconnect
power.
Turn OFF main water supply. Turn ON nearest faucet
long
enough to clear line of water.
Locate a 1/2in. to 11/4in. (1.25 cm to 3.18 cm) vertical COLD
water pipe near the refrigerator.
NOTE: Horizontal
pipe will work,
but drill on the top side of
the pipe, not the bottom.
This will help keep water away from
the drill and normal sediment
from collecting
in the valve.
4.
Determine
the length of copper tubing
you need. Measure
from the connection
on the lower left rear of refrigerator
to the
water pipe. Add 7 ft. (2.1 m) to allow for cleaning.
Use 1/4in.
(6.35 mm) O.D. (outside
diameter)
copper
tubing.
Be sure
both ends of copper
tubing
are cut square.
5.
Using a grounded
drill, drill a 1/4in. hole in the cold water pipe
you have selected.
6
1. Cold WaterPipe
5. Compression Sleeve
2. Pipe Clamp
6. Shutoff Valve
3. Copper Tubing
7. Packing Nut
4. Compression Nut
6.
Fasten the shutoff
valve to the cold water pipe with the pipe
clamp.
Be sure the outlet end is solidly
in the 1/4in. drilled hole
in the water pipe and that the washer is under the pipe clamp.
Tighten the packing
nut. Tighten the pipe clamp screws
carefully
and evenly so washer
makes a watertight
seal. Do
not overtighten
or you may crush the copper tubing.
7.
Slip the compression
sleeve and compression
nut on the
copper
tubing
as shown.
Insert the end of the tubing
into the
outlet end squarely as far as it will go. Screw compression
nut
onto outlet end with
adjustable
wrench.
Do not overtighten.
8.
Place the free end of the tubing
in a container
or sink, and
turn ON the main water supply. Flush the tubing
until water is
clear. Turn OFF the shutoff
valve on the water pipe. Coil the
copper
tubing.
Connecting to Refrigerator
1.
Attach
the
copper
tube to the
valve inlet using a compression
nut and sleeve as shown. Tighten
the compression
nut. Do
not overtighten.
Use the tube clamp on the back of the
refrigerator
to secure the tubing
to the refrigerator
as shown.
This will help prevent damage
to the tubing
when the
refrigerator
is pushed
back against
the wall.
2.
Turn shutoff
valve ON.
3.
Check for leaks. Tighten
any connections
(including
connections
at the valve) or nuts that leak.
1. TubeClamp
2. Copper Tubing
_
_41
1
3. Compression Nut
4. ValveInlet
4.
The ice maker is equipped
with a built-in
water strainer.
If
your water conditions
require a second
water strainer, install
it in the 1/4in. (6.35 mm) water
line at either tube connection.
Obtain a water strainer from your nearest appliance
dealer.
5.
Plug in refrigerator
or reconnect
power.
Your new refrigerator
may make sounds
that your old one didn't
make. Because
the sounds are new to you, you might be
concerned
about them.
Most of the new sounds
are normal.
Hard
surfaces,
such as the floor, walls, and cabinets,
can make the
sounds
seem louder. The following
describes
the kinds of sounds
and what may be making them.
If your product
is equipped
with an ice maker, you will hear a
buzzing
sound when the water valve opens to fill the ice
maker for each cycle.
Your refrigerator
is designed
to run more efficiently
to keep
your food items at the desired temperatures
and to minimize
energy usage. The high efficiency
compressor
and fans may
cause your refrigerator
to run longer than your old one. You
may also hear a pulsating
or high-pitched
sound
from the
compressor
or fans adjusting
to optimize
performance.
You may hear the evaporator
fan motor circulating
air through
the refrigerator
and freezer compartments.
The fan speed
may increase as you open the doors
or add warm food.
Rattling
noises may come from the flow of refrigerant,
the
water line, or items stored on top of the refrigerator.
Water dripping
on the defrost heater during a defrost
cycle
may cause a sizzling
sound.
As each cycle
ends, you may hear a gurgling
sound due to
the refrigerant
flowing
in your refrigerator.
Contraction
and expansion
of the inside walls may cause a
popping
noise.
You may hear air being forced
over the condenser
by the
condenser
fan.
You may hear water running
into the drain pan during the
defrost
cycle.
7
Sample