Craftsman 316380160 user manual download (Page 15 of 64)

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Page 15 of 64
15
FELLING: SAFETY
Felling is the process of cutting down a tree. Follow these safety
precautions to reduce the risk of serious injury, property damage
and damage to electrical lines:
Do not fell trees with an extreme lean. Do not fell trees with
rotten limbs, loose bark or hollow trunks. Have these trees
pushed or dragged down with heavy equipment.
Do not cut trees near buildings or electrical lines. Leave these
operations for professionals. If a felled tree does contact an
electrical line, notify the utility company immediately.
Check the tree for damaged or dead branches that could fall
and cause serious injury.
Remove dirt, stones, loose bark, nails, wire and other
obstructions from the portion of the tree that will be cut.
When bucking and felling operations are performed by two or
more persons in the same general area, they should be
separated from each other by a distance of at least twice the
height of the tree to be felled.
Consider the force and direction of the wind. Consider the lean
and balance of the tree. Consider the location of large branches.
All of these factors influence the direction that the tree will fall. Do
not try to fell a tree in a direction other than its natural fall line.
Do not fell trees during periods of precipitation or high winds.
Determine a safe and expedient escape route. Clear the area
around the tree and make sure there are no obstructions
blocking the escape route. Establish a 90º corridor of escape,
approximately 135º from the line of fall (Fig. 10).
Stay uphill from the tree; it will most likely roll or slide after it falls.
FELLING: PROCEDURE
Small trees, up to 6 - 7 inches (15 - 18 cm) in diameter, are usually
felled in a single cut. Larger trees require a sequence of two cutting
operations: a notched undercut followed by a felling back cut. It
may also be necessary to remove buttress roots.
Step 1: Removing Buttress Roots
Buttress roots are large roots that extend above the ground and
help support the tree. If the tree has large buttress roots that might
impede the felling process, follow these steps to remove them:
1.
Make a horizonal cut into the buttress root (Fig. 11). To prevent
the guide bar from being pinched by the weight of the wood,
always make this cut first.
2.
Make a vertical cut into the buttress root (Fig. 11).
3.
Remove the loose section from the work area.
Step 2: Making the Notched Undercut
This cut determines which direction the tree will fall. Always make
this cut on the side of the tree facing the direction where the tree
should fall. Make the cut at 90º to the line of fall.
1.
Make a horizontal cut into the trunk of the tree (Fig. 12). The cut
should be about 1/3 the diameter of the tree and close to the
ground. To prevent the guide bar from being pinched by the
weight of the wood, always make this cut first.
2.
Make a 45º cut into the trunk of the tree, above the first cut (Fig.
12). Continue cutting until the two cuts meet.
3.
Remove the loose section from the work area.
WARNING:
Never walk in front of a tree with a notched
undercut.
90°
Fig. 10
Planned
Line of Fall
135º From Planned
Line of Fall
Path of Safe
Retreat
Fig. 11
First Cut
Second Cut
Fig. 12
Notched
Undercut
First Cut
Second Cut
1/3 Diameter
135º From Planned
Line of Fall
Direction of Fall
Buttress Root
Sample
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