Craftsman 316351930 user manual download

For Devices:Craftsman 316351930   and 2 more
Languages:English
Pages:24
You can view the full version and download it in PDF format.
Page 5 of 24
]
_[_
ARNING:
Do not allow familiarity
with this unit to promote
carelessness.
Remember
that a careless
I
fraction of a second
is enough
to inflict
serious
injury.
1
--
i
_
ARNING:
If any
parts
are damaged
or missing,
do
not
operate
the
unit
until the
parts
are
replaced.
Failure to heed this warning
could
result
in serious
personal
injury.
_
ARNING:
Always
wear appropriate
eye and ear/hearing
protection
when
operating
this unit.
Wear
safety goggles,
or safety glasses
with
side shields,
that are marked
as meeting
ANSI Z87.1-1989
J
standards.
Failure to do so could
result
in serious
eye injury caused
by thrown
objects.
If the operation
is
dusty, wear a face
mask or dust
mask.
Use a hard hat or other type of safety helmet.
WARNING:
Wear non-slip
gloves
for maxirnum
grip and protection.
Refer to the
Safety
Information
i
section
for appropriate
safety equipment.
1
PROPER
GRIP
ON HANDLES
Hold the saw firmly with
both hands. Always
keep the left hand on
the front handle
and the right
hand on the rear handle so that the
operator's
body
is to the left of the chain line (Fig. 11). Use these
hand placements
even if the operator
is left-handed.
Maintain a proper grip on the saw whenever
the
engine
is running.
The fingers should encircle
the handle and the thumb
should wrap
under the handle (Fig. 12). This grip is least likely to be broken
by a
kickback
or other sudden reaction
of the saw. Any grip in which the
thumb and fingers are on the same side of the handle is dangerous
because a slight kick of the saw can cause loss of control
(Fig. 13).
PROPER
CUTTING
STANCE
\
Proper
Hand
Grip
Position
WARNING:
Do not operate
the throttle
control
trigger with
the left hand while holding
the front handle
with the right hand.
Never allow
any part of your
body
to be in the chain line while
operating
a saw (Fig. 14).
Balance
body weight
securely,
with
both feet on solid
ground.
Keep the left arm locked
in a "straight
arm"
position
to withstand
any kickback
force (Fig. 15).
Keep all body parts to the left of the chain
line (Fig. 15).
Make
sure the proper
grip is established
on the front handle and
rear handle.
Do not cut above
chest height
as a saw held higher is difficult to
control
against
kickback
forces.
BASIC
OPERATING/CUTTING
PROCEDURES
This unit has a 20" guide bar and is designed
to cut logs or trees
with
diameters
of 16" or less. Cutting
larger trees or logs is not
recommended.
Practice cutting a few small logs using the following
technique to get
the "feel" of using the saw before you begin a major sawing operation.
Take the proper
stance in front of the wood
or tree to be cut.
Start the engine and let the chain accelerate
to full speed
before
starting the cut. Refer to
Starting and Stopping
Instructions.
Begin cutting
with
the saw against
the log.
Keep the unit running the entire time while
cutting,
making
sure to
maintain
a steady
speed.
Allow
the chain to do the cutting;
exert only light downward
pressure.
Forcing
the cut could
result
in damage to the guide bar,
chain or engine.
Release the throttle
control
trigger
as soon as the cut is
completed.
Allow
the chain
to come to a complete
stop.
Unnecessary
wear
may occur
to the chain, guide bar and unit if
the saw
is run without
a cutting
load.
Do not put pressure
on the saw at the end of the cut.
WORK
AREA
PRECAUTIONS
Cut only wood
or materials
made from wood.
Do not attempt
to
cut sheet metal,
plastics,
masonry
or non-wood
building
materials.
Keep everyone - helpers,
bystanders,
children and animals
- 50
feet (15 m) away from the cutting
area. If anyone
enters
the work
area, stop the unit! During
felling operations,
the safe distance
should be at least twice
the height of the largest trees
in the felling
area. During
bucking
operations,
keep a minimum
distance
of 15
feet (4.6 m) between
workers.
Only operate
the unit when visibility
and light are adequate
to see
clearly.
REMOVING
BUTTRESS
ROOTS
A buttress
root is a large root extending
from the trunk of the tree
above the ground.
Remove large buttress
roots prior to felling (Fig. 16).
1. Make the horizontal
cut into the buttress
first, followed
by the
vertical
cut.
2. Remove
the resulting
loose section
from the work
area.
3. Remove
any remaining
large buttress
roots.
FELLING
i
_
ARNING:
Do not fell trees during periods
of
precipitation
or high wind.
Fig. 11
Proper
Grip
improper
Grip
improper
Stance
Fig.
12
Thumb
Below
the
Handle
Fig.
13
Chain
Line
Chain
Line
_
\
\
Fig.
14
Felling
is the term for cutting
down
a tree. When felling a tree, it is
important
to heed the following
warnings
to reduce
the risk of serious
injury:
Do not cut down trees
having an extreme
lean or large trees with
rotten
limbs,
loose bark
or hollow trunks.
Have these trees pushed
or dragged
down
with
heavy equipment,
then cut them
up.
Do not cut trees near electrical
wires or buildings.
Leave this
operation
for professionals.
Check the tree for damaged
or dead branches
that could
fall and
cause serious
personal
injury.
Periodically
glance at the top
of the tree during the back cut to see
if the tree is going to fall in the desired direction.
If the tree starts
to fall
in the wrong
direction,
or the saw gets
caught
or hung up during the fall, leave the saw and evacuate
the
area immediately!
Planned
When bucking
and felling operations
are being performed
by two or
Line of Fall
more persons,
at the same time, the felling operation
should
be
separated
from the bucking operation
by a distance
of at least twice
",qm_
the height
of the tree being felled. Trees should not be felled in a
't
manner that would endanger
any person, strike any utility line or
cause any property
damage.
If the tree does make contact
with any
utility
line, the utility company
should be notified
immediately.
The operator
should
keep on the uphill side of terrain, as the tree
135° From
is likely to roll or slide after it is felled.
Planned
Pick your escape
route (or routes in case the intended
route is
Line of Fail
blocked).
Clear the immediate
area around the tree and make sure
there are no obstructions
in your planned
path of retreat.
Clear the
I
____
Straight
Left
Arm
\
Fig.
15
Removing
Buttress
t
Roots
1_
Cut
- Vertical
i
!!/,li_||F
,/
Horizontal
Fig.
16
/
|
_
J
Path
of
_
Safe
Retreat
Fig.
17
path of safe retreat
approximately
135° from the
planned
line of fall (Fig. 17).
Consider
the force and direction
of the wind, the lean and balance
of the tree and the location
of large limbs.
These
things
influence
the direction
in which
the tree will fall. Do not try to fell a tree along a line different
from its natural
line of fall.
Remove
dirt, stones,
loose
bark, nails, staples and wire from the tree where
felling cuts are to be made.
_
ARNING:
Never walk
in front
of a tree that has
[
been
notched.
J
Small trees, up to 6-7 inches
(15-18 cm) in diameter,
are usually felled
in a single cut. Larger trees require a process
consisting
of two
main
cutting
operations:
a notched
undercut
followed
by a felling back cut.
1.
Notched
Undercut.
This cut determines
the direction
that the tree
will fall. It should be made on the side of the tree facing
the felling
direction.
Cut a notch about
1/3 the diameter
of the trunk
in the
side of the tree. Make the notch cuts so they intersect
at a right
angle to the line of fall. This notch should be cleaned
out to leave a
straight
line. To keep the weight
of the wood
off the saw, always
make the lower cut of the notch before the upper cut. (Fig. 18)
2.
Felling
Back
Cut. This cut fells
the tree. Make the back cut level
and horizontal,
and at a minimum
of 2 inches
(5 cm) above
the
horizontal
cut of the notch (Fig. 18). If the diameter
of the tree is
greater than the length of the guide bar, make two
cuts as shown
(Fig. 19). When the felling cut gets close to the hinge, the tree
should
begin to fall (Fig. 20). If there is any chance
the tree may
not fall in the desired
direction
or if it may rock back and bind the
saw chain,
stop cutting
before the felling cut is complete
and use
wedges
of wood
or plastic
to open the cut and drop the tree
along its desired
line of fall (Fig. 21).
_
WARNING:
Before making
the final cut, always
|
|
recheck
the area for bystanders,
animals
and
J
obstacles.
NOTE:
On large diameter
trees, stop the back cut before
it is deep
enough
for the tree to either fall or settle
back on the stump.
Then insert
soft wooden
or plastic wedges
into the cut so
that they do not touch the chain. Drive wedges
in, little by
little, to help jack
the tree over.
_
WARNING:
Never cut through
to the notch. Always
leave a band of wood
between
the notch and back cut
(approximately
2 inches
(5 cm) or 1/10 the diameter
of
the tree). This is called "hinge"
or "hingewood."
It
controls
the fall of the tree and prevents
slipping,
twisting
or shootback
of the tree off the stump.
3.
As the tree starts
to fall, remove the chain saw from the cut, stop
the engine and put down
the unit immediately.
Retreat along the
cleared
path, but watch the action
in case something
falls along
the retreat path.
LIMBING
Limbing is the process of removing branches from a fallen tree (Fig. 22).
Work slowly, while
maintaining
a proper
grip and stance.
Leave the larger support
limbs under the tree to keep the tree off
the ground while
cutting.
Limbs should be cut one at a time. Remove
the cut limbs from the
work
area often
to help keep the work
area clean and safe.
Branches
under tension
should
be cut from the bottom
up to avoid
binding
the chain
saw.
Keep the tree between
you and the chain saw while
limbing.
Cut
from the side of the tree opposite
the branch
that is being cut.
BUCKING
Bucking
is the process
of cutting
a fallen tree into desired
log lengths.
Work slowly, while
maintaining
a proper
grip and stance.
Cut only one log at a time.
Keep a clear cutting area. Make sure that no objects
can contact
the
guide bar nose and chain during cutting;
this can cause kickback.
Refer to
Understanding
Kickback
in the
Safety Information
section.
When bucking
on a slope,
always
stand on the uphill side of the
log. To maintain complete
control
of the chain saw when cutting
through
the log, release the cutting
pressure
near the end of the
cut without
relaxing
the grip on the chain saw
handles. Do not let
the chain contact
the ground.
After completing
the cut, wait for the
saw
chain to stop
before moving
the chain saw. Always
stop the
engine
before moving
from log to log.
NOTE:
If possible,
the log should
be supported
so that the end to
be cut off is not resting
on the ground.
The best way to hold
a log while
bucking
is to use a sawhorse.
When this is not
possible, the log should be raised and supported
by the limb
stumps
or by using supporting
logs. Be sure the log being
cut is securely
supported.
Bucking
Logs Under
Stress
Make the first
bucking cut 1/3 of the way through
the log and finish
with
a 2/3 cut on the opposite
side. The log will tend to bend
as it is
being cut. The saw
may become
pinched
or hung in the log if the first
cut is deeper than 1/3 of the diameter
of the log. Give special attention
to logs under stress to prevent the guide bar and chain from pinching.
1.
When the log is supported
on one end (Fig. 23): First, cut from the
bottom
(underbuck)
1/3 of the way
through
the log to avoid
splintering.
Second,
cut from above (overbuck)
to meet the first
cut and avoid
pinching.
2.
When the log is supported
on both
ends
(Fig. 24): First, overbuck
1/3 of the way through
the log to avoid splintering.
Second,
underbuck
to meet the first
cut and avoid
pinching.
Bucking
Fully
Supported
Logs
When the log is supported
along the entire length,
cut from the top
(overbuck),
being careful to avoid cutting
into the ground
(Fig. 25).
Overbucking
Begin on the top side of the log with
the bottom
of the saw against
the log; exert
light pressure
downward.
During
overbucking,
the saw
will tend to pull away. Be prepared
for this
reaction
and hold the saw
firmly
to maintain
control.
(Fig. 25)
Underbucking
Begin on the under
side of the log with the top of the saw against
the
log;
exert
light pressure
upward.
During
underbucking,
the saw will
tend to push back.
Be prepared
for this reaction
and hold the saw
firmly
to maintain
control.
(Fig. 26)
Bucking
with
a Wedge
If the wood
diameter
is large enough
to insert
a soft wooden
or
plastic
bucking
wedge without
touching
the chain, one should
be
used to hold the cut open
to prevent
pinching.
(Fig. 27)
Underbucking_._
_)_
1/10 Diameter
I I
__
1/3 Diameter
Fig.
18
Fig.
19
Back
Fig.
20
Wedge
Fig.
21
Limbing
3
1 ----_)_
o
4
Cut
Limbs One
at a Time and
Leave
Support
Limbs Under
the
Tree Untilthe Log is Cut
Fig.
22
Log
Supported
at One
End
Finishing Cut
Load
\
First
Cut
-
1/3 Diameter
Fig.
23
Log Supported
at Both
Ends
First
Cut
-
1/3
Diameter
Load
Finishing
Cut
Fig.
24
Overbucking
Bucking with
a Wedg__
_
Wedge
Fig.
26
Fig.
27
Sample